Interlagos (AD Jose Carlos Pace) - Fast facts and techfile PDF Print E-mail

 

Circuit sections:
1. General information and layout
2. Background and history
3. Lap of the circuit
4. Drivers and teams about the circuit
5. Fast facts and techfile
6. Multimedia

5.1 Fast facts

  • The first Brazilian Grand Prix was held at Interlagos in 1973
  • Emerson Fittipaldi won the inaugural Brazilian Grand Prix.
  • In 1978 the race was moved from Interlagos to the Jacarepaguá circuit near Rio de Janeiro. Twelve years later, the race came back to São Paulo.
  • The past two World Championships have been decided at Interlagos, with Fernando Alonso clinching the title on both occasions, despite not actually winning either race.
  • In 2006 Felipe Massa won the Grand Prix, the first Brazillian to win on home soil since Ayrton Senna won for McLaren in 1993.
  • Interlagos is one of three anti-clockwise circuits in the Formula 1 calendar - requiring considerable adjustment, above all, on the part of the drivers.
  • Red Bull grandstand suggestion, to update seating with representation of national treasures:
    Brazil: It’s the people who make a great crowd, not the grandstand, so Sao Paulo quite rightly sticks with its favella-style bits of scaffolding.

    Felipe Massa's win at Interlagos in 2006 was the first for a Brazilian since Ayrton Senna's Ford-powered Benneton took him to the chequered flag in 1993.

    As well as being Michael Schumacher's final race in  the Brazilian Grand Prix of 2006 ended engine supplier Cosworth's 39 consecutive seasons of involvement in the sport.

    Fernando Alonso's second world championship in 2006 made him the youngest back-to-back winner and just the eighth man to win consecutive titles.

    5.2 Techfile

    The 71 lap Brazilian Grand Prix will be a true test of durability, heightened by the fact that the race is run in an anti-clockwise direction. The 4.3km circuit consists of 13 medium and slow speed corners, nine left and four right, and has a blend of long, fast straights and gradient changes. With such a varied layout, set-up
    compromises are inevitable, and the challenge lies in achieving optimal aerodynamic efficiency around the lap. Interlagos is a notoriously bumpy circuit, so not only is it draining on the drivers, but the cars must have a good mechanical balance for driveability. Combined with the bumps, the track is also particularly abrasive, so harder compound tyres must be selected to ensure their survival. Engines are also under intense pressure in Brazil, with the long straights demanding extensive periods at full throttle and high revs, while the high altitude and thinning air saps approximately 8% of overall power around the lap. Plenty of overtaking opportunities, combined with the area’s unpredictable weather conditions, will only enhance what is always an entertaining spectacle in Brazil.

     

    Circuit sections:
    1. General information and layout
    2. Background and history
    3. Lap of the circuit
    4. Drivers and teams about the circuit
    5. Fast facts and techfile
    6. Multimedia

    Last Updated on Tuesday, 25 March 2008 18:31
     

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