Shanghai International Circuit - Lap of the circuit PDF Print E-mail

 

Circuit sections:
1. General information and layout
2. Background and history
3. Lap of the circuit
4. Drivers and teams about the circuit
5. Fast facts and techfile
6. Audio and video

3 Lap of the Circuit

Kimi Raikkonen’s lap of the circuit
The lap starts on the long pit straight, we power along the 600 metre section reaching speeds of 305km/h in sixth gear as we pass underneath the impressive grandstand walkway. As we reach the first corner we are down to fifth gear travelling at 234km/h, here we should pull 3.4G. This corner is very long as it sweeps round to the right, it is immediately followed by the right then left of turns two and three. Our speeds drop quite low through here to 107km/h as it is quite tight and we need to be in second gear.

As we exit turn three, we will have to push on the throttle to build up speed as we pass through the slight kinks of turns four and five that gently flick the track first left then right on the run down to turn six. We hit about 291km/h along here reaching sixth gear before braking hard for the hairpin of six, which will see us drop down into second gear and 102km/h.

Coming out of the hairpin there is a short straight that leads to a long, wide, sweeping S of seven and eight, with the track first curving to the left and then to the right. This is a chance to get the speed back up again and we reach 265km/h over turn seven and only lifting slightly for the apex of eight.

The two almost 90-degree bends of nine and ten follow which see us drop down to second gear and 137km/h before coming onto the short straight which leads to the tight left of eleven. We can reach speeds of 284km/h coming into turn 11 but drop down to second gear and 91km/h for the turn.

This then takes you onto another long sweeping right hander, similar to the complex at the end of the pit straight. This double-apex bend swings us back round on ourselves onto a straight that runs parallel to the one we were just on. The corner is the widest section of the track and it is fairly long so we are able to increase our speed to 249km/h as we drive through it and are back in fifth gear as we exit onto the back straight. This corner is particularly important for a quick lap time, as it swings round onto the longest straight, which is just over one kilometre.

We need to ensure we have the maximum speed possible as we exit the corner so that we have the momentum to power along the back straight at speeds nearing 326km/h in sixth. A hard braking zone at the end of the straight for the two rights of fourteen and fifteen as we descend to second gear and 88km/h for these corners. Again on the power for a short straight that takes you to the final corner, a 90-degree left-hander taken at 181km/h in third gear returning you to the pit straight.

Fernando Alonso 's Lap Guide

“Shanghai circuit is a very modern track; it’s very wide with a lot of safety escape roads. Gravel traps don’t really exist here; they are mainly asphalt run off areas which increases the safety. It is a very challenging track; especially Turns One, Three and Four. Turns One and Two are pretty high speed, you start in fifth gear, you downshift from seventh to fifth; you brake very gently and have to keep a lot of momentum through the corners. As you are going through here the circuit just gets tighter and slower. You then have to decelerate into Turn Three, which is a blind entry after a very long corner, so you really have to commit into it without knowing where the apex is. It helps a little that they put a post in the middle of the kerb which acts as an indicator and means we can be more precise on the entry. However the first sector is pretty difficult and it is important for a good lap, especially if you get to Turn Three and you get it right; the car has to just touch the kerb over it. The rest of the track is pretty straight forward, with a lot of heavy braking. You could have a go at someone if you have a clean exit coming out of Turn Four with good traction. You take Five completely flat easily and you brake hard into Six, which is a first gear corner. You downshift from fifth gear and if the car is good and you have good traction in Turn Four you can overtake in Turn Six. Turns Seven and Eight are very high speed. Turn Seven was flat last year in the dry, but even in the wet it was close to being flat. However it is very difficult to get to close to anyone here because of the downforce effect of following the car in front. I think Turn Seven should still be flat even with less grip from the harder Bridgestone Potenza tyres. Then we come to Turn Eight, which is a difficult corner. The car is normally very twitchy on the entry and it’s a third gear corner. Turn Nine and Ten are not very difficult. At Turn Nine you downshift from fifth to third gear and the important thing really is to go flat on the throttle once you have turned into the apex and keep it flat into 10 without lifting. It is important not to lift here as between Turns 10 and 11 there is a short straight and the extra speed you gain on the exit of 10 allows you to get into Turn 11 with more top speed. This is a second gear corner and quite tricky, you have to go over the inside corner as much as you can. Turns 12 and 13 are both flat again, if you get them right. Front graining on the tyres is a big possibility in Shanghai because of all these high speed corners. There is a very long straight coming out of Turn 13, its 1.5km which makes it quite easy to overtake into Turn 14. This is a first gear corner with very heavy braking. This just leaves you one more corner, Turn 16, a 90 degree corner leading onto the pit straight. It is quite narrow here compared to the rest of the track. It’s a third gear corner where you really have to put the power on the apex and try to get a very clean exit again to gain the maximum speed on the long pit straight.”

 

 

Circuit sections:
1. General information and layout
2. Background and history
3. Lap of the circuit
4. Drivers and teams about the circuit
5. Fast facts and techfile
6. Audio and video

  1. General info
  2. Circuit layout
  3. Background
  4. Lap of Shanghai with Kimi Raikkonen
  5. Braking analysis

Location:near Shanghai, China
Grand Prix Held: 2
Years: 

2004-2005

First Grand Prix: 2004
Last Grand Prix: 2005
Opened: 2004
Circuit Length:5451 m
www.f1-china.com.cn/en_version

China| Shanghai

BRAKING ANALYSIS

Data kindly provided by BREMBO

BRAKING 01BRAKING 02

Initial speed [Km/h]

310

Initial speed [Km/h]

290

Final speed [Km/h]

190

Final speed [Km/h]

85

Stopping distance [m]

150

Stopping distance [m]

130

Braking time [sec]

2.0

Braking time [sec]

2.7

Maximum deceleration [g]

4.5

Maximum deceleration [g]

4.5

Maximum disc temperature °C

900

Maximum disc temperature °C

900

Maximum pedal load [Kg]

80

Maximum pedal load [Kg]

80

BRAKING 03BRAKING 04

Initial speed [Km/h]

280

Initial speed [Km/h]

318

Final speed [Km/h]

100

Final speed [Km/h]

80

Stopping distance [m]

110

Stopping distance [m]

140

Braking time [sec]

2.5

Braking time [sec]

3.0

Maximum deceleration [g]

4.0

Maximum deceleration [g]

5.0

Maximum disc temperature °C

1000

Maximum disc temperature °C

1000

Maximum pedal load [Kg]

85

Maximum pedal load [Kg]

90

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 October 2007 21:45
 

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